2012 – Acupuncture inhibits cue-induced heroin craving and brain activation

Acupuncture inhibits cue-induced heroin craving and brain activation.

Previous research using functional MRI has shown that specific brain regions associated with drug dependence and cue-elicited heroin craving are activated by environmental cues. Craving is an important trigger of heroin relapse, and acupuncture may inhibit craving. In this study, we performed functional MRI in heroin addicts and control subjects. We compared differences in brain activation between the two groups during heroin cue exposure, heroin cue exposure plus acupuncture at the Zusanli point (ST36) without twirling of the needle, and heroin cue exposure plus acupuncture at the Zusanli point with twirling of the needle. Heroin cue exposure elicited significant activation in craving-related brain regions mainly in the frontal lobes and callosal gyri. Acupuncture without twirling did not significantly affect the range of brain activation induced by heroin cue exposure, but significantly changed the extent of the activation in the heroin addicts group. Acupuncture at the Zusanli point with twirling of the needle significantly decreased both the range and extent of activation induced by heroin cue exposure compared with heroin cue exposure plus acupuncture without twirling of the needle. These experimental findings indicate that presentation of heroin cues can induce activation in craving-related brain regions, which are involved in reward, learning and memory, cognition and emotion. Acupuncture at the Zusanli point can rapidly suppress the activation of specific brain regions related to craving, supporting its potential as an intervention for drug craving.

Reference
Journal: Neural Regen Res. 2012 Nov 25;7(33):2607-16. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1673-5374.2012.33.006.
Authors: Cai X1, Song X2, Li C3, Xu C3, Li X2, Lu Q3.
Keywords: Zusanli (ST36); activation of brain regions; acupuncture; craving; cues induction; functional MRI; heroin addiction; neural regeneration; traditional Chinese medicine; twirling
PubMed ID (PMID): 25368637
PMCID: PMC4200728
DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1673-5374.2012.33.006


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